The Long Road Home

And somehow it all came to an end.

It happened in the blink of the eye before I even knew it. Actually it happened in roughly a week’s time, but the next thing I knew I was back in the States, back in the groove, and back where I started unsure if I was meant for traveling in circles. Somehow straight lines had suited me just fine.

A straight line has no end. It keeps moving. Circles end and begin again. To end is one thing, but to begin again is another.

I wasn’t ready.

Yet, nine days, five planes and a lifetime away I found myself back at the beginning.

The journey from the life of my dreams back to the life of my reality began in Mumbai on a late afternoon flight to Kuala Lumpur. The hyper-extravagance of Kuala Lumpur — all glittery gold and tacky tart — was the first sign that I wasn’t ready to go back.

The crisp air-conditioned bus. A fast food chain on every corner. Megamalls. Monorails. The Asian leg of my journey began here. At the time, I found it so incredibly exotic. Upon returning, it felt remarkably reminiscent of the life I’d left behind.

I had to get out, to run away one last time. So, I ran to the deep jungle of the earth’s oldest rainforest, Taman Negara.

Wandering the jungle alone like a madman — sleeping on planks of wood in animal hides and spending my days tearing bloodsucking leeches from my feet — I explored the ancient land. I waded through chest-deep rivers, followed tiger prints, tip toed around elephant poo, and came face to face with a wild, leopard-sized Asiatic golden cat and her two cubs. I left the jungle with shoes full of blood and eyes devoid of fear.

Wasn’t that was this was all about anyway?

“To dream anything that you want to dream / That’s the beauty of the human mind / To do anything that you want to do / That is the strength of the human will / To trust yourself to test your limits / That is the courage to succeed.” – Bernard Edmonds

Man will never know his true strength until he tests it. Sure, plenty have tested their fate in much bolder, nobler ways. But this was my story. This was my climax. And I wasn’t sure if there would be another. You can never truly know what the climax of your life will be until it’s too late.

I was detained, searched, and questioned upon arrival in Christchurch, New Zealand as aftershocks rattled the ground. Border police released me two hours later after every item in my bag was meticulously inspected, swabbed, scanned, and sniffed.

My friend Karen, who served as caretaker of my things, met me in the North Island that afternoon. She had kept my luggage tucked under her downtown Auckland bed in such a way that it lifted the lower end of her mattress. The neatly arranged mementoes of my life in New Zealand had thus become a footrest.

Karen gave me a warm Western welcome, calling me too skinny and making it her goal to fatten me up in three day’s time. She had completed the same journey I did almost 15 years before and, when we spoke of our paths through Asia, we realized that, all and all, little had changed.

Three days later, after making peace with what I consider the most beautiful country in the world and a second home, I caught another series of planes – first to San Francisco, then to Washington, D.C.

Two weeks later, I caught a bus back to New York City, found a job, and the line became a circle again.

Travel is like a drug. Rather, it was my drug, and I got really high. Coming down was the hardest part.

The high began three-and-a-half years before it ended. It started with the travel bug, progressed to island fever in the Caribbean, morphed into ex-pat addiction in Oceania, dabbled in traveler’s diarrhea in Asia and ended in denial back in America.

And so, this is my last post as Mark on the Map. I’ve learned a lot transferring my first impressions and second thoughts into a blog for everyone to read.

I’ve gown up charting my journey on here. Thanks for indulging me. Thanks for reading. Thanks for caring. This blog enabled me to move on to the next stage of my life and you can continue to follow my professional career as a travel writer by checking out the information on the “About” page.

If you take anything away from this blog, I hope it’s this:

“Not all those who wander are lost.”

It’s been my motto from the very start and remains my motto today.

Farewell and get lost,

MarkontheMap (a.k.a. Mark Johanson)

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9 thoughts on “The Long Road Home

  1. Mark, Thanks for sharing your experience. I have lived vicarously through your travels. You have impressed upon me the benefits of going out on the limb and embracing your dreams! God bless and may we have the chance to meet again sometime.

  2. A beautiful ending to a wonderful blog, but not the end of the story. Enjoy your exciting journey, and I can vicariously be along with you by reading your travel articles and seeing your pictures. I am very proud of you.

  3. Welcome home, Mark. I have traveled much of the world but never to many of the places you have been and at my age and my declining health, I probably won’t; therefore, I appreciated making the journey with you through photos and the imagery in your writing. I have a time share in NYC so hopefully we can meet there some day.
    Mrs. Borden

  4. A fitting and poignant ending to an amazing journey! Mark, I am so proud of your writing and your courage in traveling to places I could never imagine myself going. You manage to make remarkable connections with people everywhere you go, which is a very special talent that will take you far in life. Most of all, I’m proud to be your sister. Keep on traveling, writing, and being your awesome self.

    Love,

    Kristin

  5. This was the entry I was dreading to read. That crash from living the travel and then resorting back to what I can only coin as a mundane existence has left me.. sad that I could relate to the crash. All things said, thanks for sharing your wonderful stories, photos and experiences with the world. I’m glad you got a job out of this. I hope to read a continuation of this blog one day in the future. Til then, wander til you’re lost. :)

  6. everything comes full circle they say.

    great to have been a part of your epic journey! this isn’t the end, is it? how i wish i have the time and the opportunity to explore all these wonderful places as well!

    keep wandering for you’re never lost!

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